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, deeply disappointed by that. we may be on the verge of a fiscal cliff short-term agreement. the house of representatives, however, will not vote tonight. deal or no deal, there could be a significant impact on your taxes. tom foreman is joining us with more on this part of the storst. >> if you're sitting at home right now and you don't care about the democrats and republicans, you don't care about the white house, and you don't care about congress, you still need to be watching this number and paying attention because if that reaches zero tonight and we don't have a solid promise that a deal is in the works, it could affect everyone's wallet because everyone's taxes are going to go up. let me show you some examples here. let's say you make $50,000 in your household. that's about the median income in this country right now. your taxes next year will increase $2,000 and they'll stay up $2,000 for every year after until this deal gets fixed. we wouldn't think it would go on forever, buthat's a huge chunk. let's talk people who make $75,000. two incomes, little different if you're single
leader harry reid says we're all headed for fiscal disaster. >> if we go over the cliff, and it looks like that's where we're headed, mr. president, the house of representatives, as we speak, with four days left before the first of the year, aren't here. >> we're now told the house will finally return to work on sunday. now, that's december 30th. in other words, less than 48 hours before we go over the fiscal cliff. meanwhile, president obama cut his hawaii vacation short to return to washington today. but has he been working on a deal? "outfront" tonight, reports from both ends of pennsylvania avenue. chief white house correspondent, jessica yellin, and senior congressional correspondent, dana bash. jessica, first, to you, the president's back in washington, wheels down. he left his christmas vacation early. but was this just a bit of showmanship, or has he been working on something specific? >> reporter: hey, john. well, today has been a bit of a quiet day here at the white house. publicly, the president has been scarce, no sign of him. behind closed doors, i'm told a few meetings i
all go overs fiscal cliff. that meeting lasted for an hour and five minutes. on a story where every second and every maneuver counts, let's get chief to white house correspondent jessica yellin. jessica, the president says he's modestly optimist being but each also presented a backup plan. does the president really think it will come to that? >> at this point, no, they don't, john, because the white house is hopeful that the agreement that the senators are working on can actually move forward after the meeting here. there is a modest uptick in enthusiasm about that possibility. but as forts backup plan, there's no real likelihood that would ever come to a vote because republicans would likely block it in both the senate and might -- it would likely not come to a vote in the house. so that's really more rhetoric than it is reality and we have to hope for option a, getting an agreement in the senate if we're going to avoid going over the cliff. >> rhetoric versus reality. that's always a tricky place to be in washington. listen, this is some serious high stakes political poker here. w
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)

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